Taking a Personal Interest in You and Your Business

Fraud Alert

Questions about possible scams or fraud? Please call us immediately at 213-430-7000, or contact your Relationship Manager.

E-mail Claiming to Notify Customers of Rejected ACH Transactions

The National Automated Clearing House Association (NACHA) has issued a warning about a new e-mail scam designed to fool small businesses into downloading password-stealing software disguised as an ACH transaction report. The e-mail’s subject line reads “Rejected ACH Transaction,” and includes a link that redirects the victim to a phony NACHA Web page in which users download a report which actually has a copy of the Zeus/Zbot Trojan virus. The virus tracks keystrokes which can later be analyzed to determine user names and passwords.

1st Enterprise Bank does not email ACH transaction reports. The reports are available by logging on to our Business Internet Banking website.

E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The subject line of the e-mail states: “Check Your Bank Deposit Insurance Coverage.” The e-mail tells recipients that, "You have received this message because you are a holder of an FDIC-insured bank account. Recently FDIC has officially named the bank you have opened your account with as a failed bank, thus, taking control of its assets.”

The e-mail then asks recipients to “visit the official FDIC website and perform the following steps to check your Deposit Insurance Coverage” (a fraudulent link is provided). It then instructs recipients to “download and open your personal FDIC Insurance File to check your Deposit Insurance Coverage.”

This e-mail and associated web site are fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, some of which may be used to gain unauthorized access to on-line banking services or to conduct identity theft.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers. Financial institutions and consumers should NOT follow the link in the fraudulent e-mail.

Credit Card Interest Rate Reduction Telephone Scam

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) is receiving reports of a new telephone scam from a company that refers to itself as "CreditCard Services." The company claims to be affiliated with the FDIC and offers to lower credit card interest rates.

To verify qualification of the lower interest rate, the caller asks for personal or confidential information. This scam is a variation of a telephone scam in which identity thieves try to persuade consumers to provide information such as, credit card numbers, bank account numbers, social security numbers, and PIN numbers, in the attempt to access accounts or to commit identity theft.

The Federal Trade Commission encourages consumers to report telemarketing fraud at FTC.gov or by calling 1-877-FTC-HELP. See the following link to the FTC's Web site for more information: http://www.ftc.gov/phonefraud.

Information about fraudulent activity involving the FDIC should also be transmitted electronically to the FDIC's Cyber-Fraud and Financial Crimes Section by e-mailing it to alert@fdic.gov.

E-mail Claiming to Be From the FDIC

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has received numerous reports of a fraudulent e-mail that has the appearance of being sent from the FDIC.

The subject line of the e-mail states: "Inquiry about your bank account." The e-mail tells recipients that, "due to many fraud and money laundering attempts made by non-US residents the past 2 months using fake information to open US bank accounts, and using them for illegal purposes, we require all FDIC member's banks customers to update some information on their bank accounts as soon as possible in order to confirm their identities."

The e-mail then asks recipients to follow a hyperlink and then to click on their bank’s logo. It then informs recipients that they will be redirected to their bank’s Web site "through a specialized link" and that, once logged in, they will need to "fill some information."

This e-mail is fraudulent. Recipients should consider the intent of this e-mail as an attempt to collect personal or confidential information, some of which may be used to gain unauthorized access to on-line banking services or to conduct identity theft.

The FDIC does not issue unsolicited e-mails to consumers. Financial institutions and consumers should NOT follow the link in the fraudulent e-mail.

E-mail Claiming to Be From Federal Reserve Bank

Fraudulent e-mails claiming to be from the Federal Reserve Bank warning of a phishing attack on the Fedwire system are reportedly in circulation. The fraudulent e-mails claim that a phishing attack has affected the Fedwire system and that restrictions are in place. The e-mails further instruct recipients to click on links within the e-mail for additional information.

The fraudulent e-mails have included various spoofed names and addresses in the “From:” line of the messages, including “Bank System Administration,” “System Administration,” and “Federal Reserve Bank.” The e-mails contain the following message (including shown grammatical errors):

FEDERAL RESERVE BANK

Important: You're getting this letter in connection with new directives issued by U.S. Treasury Department. The directives concern U.S. Federal Wire online payments.

On On January 1, 2009 a large-scaled phishing attack started and has been still lasting. A great number of banks and credit unions is affected by this attack and quantity of illegal wire transfers has reached an extremely high level.

U.S. Treasury Department, Federal Reserve and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) in common worked out a complex of immediate actions for the highest possible reduction of fraudulent operations. We regret to inform you that definite restrictions will be applied to all Federal Wire transfers from January 6 till January 16.

Here you can get more detailed information regarding the affected banks and U.S. Treasury Department restrictions:”

The message contains links to two Web pages that attempt to load malicious Trojan horse programs onto end users’ computers.

Consumers, businesses, and financial institutions should be aware that Fedwire operations are not restricted and are operating as normal and should take the following precautions.

  • If an end user received the e-mail and clicked on any of the links, fully scan the computer using updated anti-virus software. If malicious code is detected on the computer, consult with a computer security or anti-virus specialist to remove the malicious code or re-install a clean image of the computer system.

  • Be aware that phishing e-mails frequently have links to Web pages that host malicious code and software. Do not follow Web links in unsolicited e-mails from apparent Federal banking agencies. Instead, bookmark or type the agency’s Web address.

  • Always use anti-virus software and ensure that the virus signatures are automatically updated. Ensure that the computer operating systems and common software applications security patches are installed.

  • Do not open unsolicited or unexpected e-mail attachments because of the risk of malicious code or software in the attachments. Instead, call the agency using a known and appropriate telephone number to verify the legitimacy of the message and attached file.

  • Be alert for different variations of the fraudulent e-mails.